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Diversity and Inclusion Resources for Curricula: Classes at SU

This list was compiled by SU's Healing Action group and is updated each semester.

In fall 2020, Healing Action sent out a call to all SU faculty, asking them to submit any courses they will be teaching within the next academic year that relate to themes of diversity and inclusion, particularly with regard to marginalized populations, histories of representation, and changing cultural politics.
 
This list includes ALL the submissions received from faculty, which are presented without endorsement or editorializing. This is not a comprehensive list, but it is a growing one. The Healing Action group is hopeful that this will provide students with an easy place to look for current courses that resonate with their needs, supplementary to our university catalog--please note that some course listings are not regularly offered, and therefore not automatically covered by other campus publications. Ideally this will also be a useful resource for faculty looking to connect with others with whom they might collaborate.
 
Courses are organized by school and department.

Clarke Honors College

ENGL 300/ HONR 311: Gay American Fiction

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: T. Ross Leasure

Description: The 20th Century in the United States sees the coalescence of a new identity category based upon its divergence from heteronormativity, that of the homosexual or “gay” man. Out of the psychiatric study of so-called sexual pathologies in the late 19th Century, such a figure was created, and as many men recognized in themselves the realization of this new understanding of selfhood, some explored the state, condition, and experiences of men who love other men in an American milieu characterized by the denial or denigration of those who did not conform. This course examines representative novels by and about gay men from the turn of the century up to the Stonewall Uprising in New York City in 1969.

*Non-Honors students must contact Dr. Leasure for permission before attempting to register.

College of Health and Human Services

HLTH 490 Special Topics: Unequal Burdens in Health

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Deneen Long-White

Description: Racial and ethnic minorities in the United States bear an unequal burden of health problems. To understand these issues, one must increase our understanding of the multiple pathways in which race and ethnicity impact disparate health outcomes. Discussions and exercises in the course will focus on specific groups and how the patterns, causes and consequences of white privilege have persisted in American society over time and challenge students to begin to think about ways to address these health disparities.

*The course will be offered as a special topics course spring 2022. Starting in fall 2022, the course will be a part of the regular curriculum.

NURS 858: Population Health and Clinical Prevention Services

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Anastacia Keenan

Description: Focuses on collaborative strategies in a variety of settings to implement evidence-based clinical prevention and population health services. Students critically analyze and communicate national, regional and local data to discern health disparities across age, sex, gender and ethnicity. Through collaboration with external agencies, students utilize theories of behavioral changes and action research to develop, implement and evaluate healthcare strategies and health promotion plans to address socioeconomic, cultural, ethical, and environmental health issues. Inclusion of global health issues and comprehensive determinants are also discussed.

SOWK 309: Privilege and Oppression

Offered: Every Spring

Instructor: Various Social Work Professors

Description: Introduces and sensitizes students to the major concepts of cultural diversity, race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, age, class, sexual orientation, physical and mental abilities, pluralism and conflicts caused by ethnocentrism, discrimination and prejudice. Explores the relationship and intersection between these major concepts and social work practices and policies. Emphasizes the examination of major ethnic groups as well as other social groupings based on such factors as gender, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, physical and mental abilities, and other differences in human populations. Evaluates the common elements of oppressions and prejudicial and discriminatory practices from both micro and macro theoretical frames of reference. Explores the application of the ecological perspective, generalist and problem-solving process.


SOWK 351: Deaf Culture and Deaf History

Offered: Fall 2022

Instructor: Various Social Work Professors

Description: Provides insights and perspectives on the cultural aspects and history of the deaf and hard of hearing communities in the United States.


SOWK 454 - Multidisciplinary Practice/Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Offered: Spring 2022 and Spring 2023

Instructor: Various Social Work Professors

Description: Provides insights and perspectives on the psychological, educational, social, rehabilitation, legal and employment aspects of people who are deaf and hard of hearing in the United States.


SOWK 475 - Disabilities Studies: Culture and Practice

Offered: Fall 2022

Instructor: Various Social Work Professors

Description: Provides an overview of physical, social and emotional implications of being differently abled within the context of generalist social work practice. Examines the life course of people who are differently abled, including the collaboration of families and community, the role of social workers and other health professionals, as well as presenting general issues related to services available, advocacy movements and social policy.


SOWK 486 - Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+ people

Offered: Fall 2022

Instructor: Various Social Work Professors

Description: Provides the foundation knowledge needed for generalist practice with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) persons. Explores the lived experiences of LGBTQ persons in the U.S. across the lifespan and addresses some of the key social problems faced by this population. Explores the heterogeneity of LGBTQ lives across cultural, class, age, race, ethnic, religious and political cohorts and communities. Assumes a strengths-based affirmative model of social work practice with sexual minorities.

Fulton School of Liberal Arts

ANTH 102: Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Elizabeth Ragan

Description: Gen Ed III B/C. This is an introduction to the study of the human past, from our earliest identifiable ancestors on.  (The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.)  Developments in regions other than Europe and the Middle East are highlighted.  Other topics covered include human biological variation (race, DNA as evidence for ancestry) and biomedical anthropology (the impact of disease on human societies).

ART 311 History of Pre-Columbian Art

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Jennifer Liston

Description: This course will introduce students to the art and architecture of the indigenous civilizations of Mexico, Central America, and the Andean region of South America from approximately 2000 BCE until European conquest. Lectures and assigned readings will situate principal works of art in their historical, political, and social contexts and functions, with close attention given to the formal, technical, and thematic qualities of these works of art. Themes emphasized will include indigenous conceptions of sacred landscape, specific cultural practices such as shamanism and sacrifice, and art’s role in constructing community identity as well as serving the specific interests of a polity’s ruling elite. Students will also be introduced to the various theoretical and methodological concerns of the field and will learn about the obstacles historians encounter when attempting to reconstruct the indigenous past.


ART 391: Special Topics in Art History

Offered: TBA

Instructor: Jennifer Kruglinski

Description: Global Contemporary Art after 1980, which focuses on the global context of the art world after 1980 (rather than just a western history, as is often the case). A survey of major global art movements after 1980, including key theoretical writings by artists and critics. Topics include the growth of “biennials” and art fairs, the politics of globalism and the market for contemporary art, the artist-as-curator, the post-medium condition, art and identity politics, among others.

CADR 405/620 Restorative and Transitional Justice

Offered: Every Fall Semester

Instructor: Brittany Foutz

Description: This combined undergraduate and graduate seminar considers the interconnected fields of restorative and transitional justice, providing an understanding of the potential that they have to address past harms, either when crimes are committed or in societies that have experienced mass violence, such as particularly with regard to marginalized populations. First, the theory and practice of restorative justice as a reconciliatory response to crime are carefully considered. This foundation comes out of a tradition of criminal justice reform, based upon a cultural healing paradigm. Transitional justice is also holistically considered in the context of societal reconstruction in the aftermath of mass violence and war, examining processes such as prosecution, reparations, institutional reform, and memorializing. However, truth commissions (an approach to dialogue and truth-telling) are given particular attention as a central component of transitional justice. This course also offers students ample opportunities to role-play and practice restorative and transitional justice skills.

COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Lori DeWitt, Melany Trenary, Chrys Egan

Course description: Introduction to the basic principles and theories of human communication. Explores contexts such as interpersonal relationships, small groups, organizations, intercultural interaction and public speaking. In each context, practice skills of effective communication while gaining understanding of the relevant theories and research that are foundational to the discipline. Designed for communication arts majors and minors.


COMM 102: Introduction to Mass Media

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Jim Burton, Michael Moeder, Aaron Gurlly, Chrys Egan

Course description: Theory, history, structure and functions of mass media (print, film, recording, radio, television, new media), advertising, journalism and public relations.


COMM 405: Family Communication

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Carolina Bown, Chrys Egan

Course description: Characterization of family styles of communication as they reflect values, attitudes and perceptions of family members as a group. Examination of effects of individual communication strategies on development of family patterns of interaction.


COMM 430: Political Communication

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: David Burns, Joshua Bolton, Chrys Egan

Course description: Studies the role of media and rhetoric in political campaigns and the political process.

ENGL 253: Short Story

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Christopher Vilmar

Description: This course studies short stories, particularly their representation of how identites are constructed (such as gender, sexual orientation, race, and so on). There is a focus on historical context, and understanding these stories as an illuminating window on how the past has differed from the present. Of particular interest are the various ways that identity has been conceived and constructed at different points in history.


ENGL 256 Latina/o/x Literature

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this course we will read a variety of contemporary Latina/o/x literary texts as we push against the notion of a homogeneous Latino identity. We will pay attention to the specific histories of migration and immigration that shape the lives of people of north/ central/ south American descent living in the US. In doing so, we will consider the diversity within a group often lumped together under the umbrella term “Latino.” As we read the literary texts, we will examine the idea of home, asking questions such as: What constitutes home? What is the relationship between home and belonging? How do we develop a sense of belonging to a place? How do the ideas of home and belonging underlie the notion of social inclusion and exclusion from social representation? How does the idea of home allow us to articulate narratives of the nation? We will use the seemingly simple notion of home, a commonplace concept that we might take for granted, as the basis for our approach to


ENGL 300/ HONR 311: Gay American Fiction

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: T. Ross Leasure

Description: The 20th Century in the United States sees the coalescence of a new identity category based upon its divergence from heteronormativity, that of the homosexual or “gay” man. Out of the psychiatric study of so-called sexual pathologies in the late 19th Century, such a figure was created, and as many men recognized in themselves the realization of this new understanding of selfhood, some explored the state, condition, and experiences of men who love other men in an American milieu characterized by the denial or denigration of those who did not conform. This course examines representative novels by and about gay men from the turn of the century up to the Stonewall Uprising in New York City in 1969.

*Non-Honors students must contact Dr. Leasure for permission before attempting to register.


ENGL 383: African American Literature II - Race, Aesthetics, and Politics

Offered: Fall 2022

Instructor: April Logan

Description: Study of major African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. May include such writers as Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Petry, Madhubuti, Sanchez, Morrison, Walker, Wilson, Jones, and Trethewey. In particular, this course traces the evolution of African American aesthetics: provocative debates regarding African American art and literature and the historical developments and figures that shaped them.


ENGL 389 Topics in Native American Literature--Storytelling

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this course we will read contemporary Native American literature and explore the practice of storytelling. Storytelling rests not only at the core of Indigenous literary traditions but also at the center of Native world-making and orientations toward the world. Thinking about storytelling will help us examine how formative storytelling is in the context of oral traditions, ways of maintaining a historical records, and ways of maintaining (or regaining) a sense of identity. We will consider the power of stories to understand the world, but, most importantly, their power to create the world as well. Diving into Native cosmologies [theories about the origins of the universe] and epistemologies [theories of knowledge], we will consider how storytelling shapes Indigenous literary works. We will look for answers to the following questions: How does the concept of Native storytelling differ or overlap with Western ideas of storytelling? If we consider the power of stories to create the world, how do we think about Native literary works? How does storytelling shape indigenous identity? How does storytelling shape Indigenous literary works?

ENVR 205: Art, Nature, Culture

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Shane Hall

Description: How do we know the world—the world of humans and of the natural world—through things like books, poems, plays, songs, and stories? How does culture—the ideas and worldviews inherent in our actions— shape the way we relate to the world around us? What lies at the root of our contemporary environmental crisis, and what can we do about it? In this class we use the key tools of the humanities—close reading, critical ethical and argumentative thinking, and creating art—to answer these and other pressing questions. The class is structured around four interrelated inquiries: questions of “values, ethics, and morals,” questions of “nature and the natural,” questions of “power, social inequality, and social justice,” and “stories, representation, and language.” Topics related directly to issues of diversity and inclusion include: environmental racism, religious views of environmental issues, environmental justice, white and male privilege in environmental movements, and climate justice.


ENVR 302: Environment and Society

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructors: Mike Lewis & Sarah Surak

Description: Focuses on the interlinked natural and social systems of the contemporary world. Particular attention is given to the qualitative social sciences and history, and to analyzing the public and political discourses surrounding environmental regimes. Topics related to diversity, justice, and inclusion include environmental racism, the global anti-toxics movement, and sustainable development.


ENVR 320: Environmental Justice

Offered: every Fall

Instructor: Shane Hall

 Description: Prerequisites Two courses in ENVR or junior standing. The struggle for environmental justice is the struggle against environmental racism and for “human rights, healthy environments, and thriving democracies led by communities most negatively impacted by economic and ecological degradation" (Di Chiro 2016, 100). In this course students study the “Principles of Environmental Justice” outlined by the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit (held in 1991, and 2002). As such, students explore how communities of color and low-income communities struggle to redefine environmentalism in the face of “toxic oppression and oppressive toxics” (Ricardo Levins Morales). By taking the course, students learn how issues of social justice and environmental change are interrelated. To do this, students meet for seminar discussions of primary sources and voices from frontline communities and scholarship from the social sciences and humanities. We examine environmental justice struggles through poetry, plays, politics, protests, and personal testimony. Prerequisites: upper-division status or permission of instructor.

FILM 404 International Cinema

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Elsie Walker

Description: “Once you overcome the one-inch tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many more amazing films,” says Bong Joon-ho, the academy-award winning South Korean director of PARASITE. Bong's words can inspire us all to learn more about the world through cinema. Dr. Walker has taught in three countries, and she is passionate about how films can help us journey to places we've never dreamt of before.

We can all virtually journey to remote places and times through movies—from idyllic country landscapes of New Zealand (in WHALE RIDER) to hostile urban scenes (in LA HAINE), and from the city streets of Tokyo (in NOBODY KNOWS) to the remotest swampland of Australia (in TEN CANOES). Come learn more about diverse countries on screen. STEP OVER THAT BARRIER AND JOIN THE DIALOGUE! No prerequisite is required—the language of cinema is for everyone.

History 201 - U.S. History to 1865

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Aston Gonzalez

Description: trong emphasis of the experience of Native Americans, African Americans (free and enslaved), women, and immigrants as part of a broad survey of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that have shaped the pattern of life in the United States.


History 314 - African American History to 1865

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Aston Gonzalez

Description: Explores African American history from the Colonial period to 1865. Highlights the development and perpetuation of slavery, the vibrancy of free black communities, the rise of antislavery leaders and movements, and social conditions experienced by African Americans.


HIST 320-001: From Romans to Vikings

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Belen Vicens

Description: This course surveys the cultures and institutions of Europe and the Mediterranean world from the rise of Christianity to the 11th century. We will study, among other themes, the making of barbarian kingdoms, the rise of Islam, and the Viking Age, paying close attention to the mixing of different ethnic, linguistic, and religious populations across the late antique and early medieval periods.


HIST 363: Japanese Civilization

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Michael McCarty

Description: The course explores Japan and its relationship to other East Asian civilizations from ancient times to around 1800. We investigate many non-Western religious and intellectual traditions, such as Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shinto. In addition to exploring how Japanese and East Asian culture is different from western culture, we also consider how myths and stereotypes such as Orientalism have obscured the reality and diversity of experiences in Japan. We raise the question of the spectrum between cultural homogeneity vs. diversity and how cultures and social structures change over time. By looking at connections between Japan and the rest of the world we will advocate for a more inclusive approach to global history.


History 430 - Research Seminar Capstone: Revolt and Dissent in the 19th-Century United States

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Aston Gonzalez

Description: Guns. Petitions. Conventions. Suits. Lawsuits. Explore many forms of dissent that clashed with commonly held beliefs and practices during the 19th century. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, examine the strategies that Native Americans, women, African Americans, transpeople, religious minorities and unpropertied men (to name a few) used to challenge their circumstances. Create an original research paper or project using primary and secondary sources focused on a specific topic within 19th century United States history.

SPAN 336: Survey of Latin American Literature

Offered: Fall 2021 

Instructor: Corinne Pubill

Description: This course emphasizes fundamental issues such as nation building and the role of the intellectual, gender, sexuality, race, and class struggle in order to develop a critical view of literary works within the political, social, and economic realities of Latin America. 

MUSA 102: Jazz Ensemble and Improvisation

Offered: Every semester

Instructor: Jerry Tabor

Description : We'll be talking about racism and impact it has had on the music black musicians created. As we prepare to propose our new Jazz and Culture Minor, which focuses quite a bit on African and Latin culture, the Jazz Ensemble is functioning as an application "lab" of sorts. Study and performance of a variety of jazz styles, including swing, bebop, cool, hard bop, contemporary, blues, fusion and Latin in big band and small and large combo contexts. Study and application of improvisation skills as an integral part of the ensemble experience. Open to all students and community players. Fulfills large ensemble requirement for music major and minor. Performance background, sight-reading skills preferred. Prerequisite: Placement audition required. Contact instructor immediately after registration. three hours per week.


MUSC 210-151: Special Topics in Music: Music of Japanese Pop Culture: From Nintendo to Naruto

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Sachi Murasugi

Description: The music of Japanese Pop Culture such as anime, videogames, and idol groups tells a fascinating story of tradition, commerce, politics and power. We will examine the characteristics of the music, the amalgamation of Japanese and Western musical conventions and influences from other Asian nations, in an effort to understand the broader cultural, technical and societal contexts in which the music was created.


MUSC 222: Popular Music History

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Danielle Cumming

Description: I've redesigned the class to focus entirely on African American music, with all assigned listening and reading to be by African American musicians and authors. This fall, one of the texts I'm using is "Mo' Meta Blues" by Questlove, and I'm following his list of influential recordings as required listening. So my students will listen to the music that Questlove says is important - way better than coming from me!

PSYC 423: Developmental Disabilities

Offered:  Fall 2021

Instructors:  Heidi Fritz, Jason McCartney

Description: The Developmental Disabilities research area is an interdisciplinary convergence of Developmental Psychology, Health Psychology, Medicine, and Epidemiology.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with various types of developmental disabilities and the impact they have on an individual’s health and functioning, family adaptation, and broader societal issues.  We examine the causes and trajectories of the developmental disabilities most commonly encountered by parents, educators, and medical professionals, including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Seizure Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Neuromuscular Disorders, and AD/HD.  Throughout the course, we orient development within a broader family and community framework, examining the research on family stresses and adaptation, public school laws and practices for accommodating children with disabilities, therapeutic treatments such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy, and issues related to navigating the health care system.  We also examine recent societal changes, difficulties, and controversies that affect people with disabilities, their families, and the professionals serving them.

PSYC 495-002:  Diversity Equity Neuroscience

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Echo Leaver

Description: Science does not take place in a vacuum. The researchers, the topics chosen, the funding, and the publications are all subject to the same systemic biases that exists in society. In this course we will discuss: the obstacles that under-represented minorities face while engaging in Neuroscience research; the relationship between the disparities in Neuroscience and the inequities in how neuroscientific knowledge is applied and shared; relevant case studies, narratives, media coverage, and journal articles. This class can count toward the Psychology Major's Group A: Brain Sciences Requirement and toward the Cognitive Science minor.

SOCI 301 Studies in Sociology (Topic: African American Experience)

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Ellen Kang

Description: This course offers a socio-cultural examination of the African American experience, beginning with the history of African slavery, continuing with the Civil Rights Movement and other social movements, and applying Critical Race theory and sociological theoretical perspectives to these events. The course will also include cross-cultural comparisons with the African diaspora in the West Indies/Caribbean. Each time this class is taught it is with a particular theme, such as black social movements, e.g., Black Panthers, college student protests, etc., African American foodways (the cultural practices of food production, preparation, and consumption), or service learning projects with a community organization. The theme for Fall 2021 will be foodways.


SOCI 390: Sociology of Environment 

Offered: every Fall

Instructor: Ryan Sporer

Description: In this class students will review literature relevant to the origins of environmental sociology, assess major competing theories, and learn about cases studies in sociology that incorporate non-social variables. Specific focus is given to the Environmental Racism, Environmental Justice Movement, and Global South Movements. 

THEA 300: Theatre Histories I

Offered: Every Fall

Instructor: Matt Saltzberg or Blake Harris

Description: Recognizing theatre as a diverse global art, this course includes and moves beyond the western, white, male cannon, as it provides a space for us as artists, academics, and informed citizens to excavate the past so we can better understand the present in an effort to shape the future. Through creative expressions and theoretical discussions, the course focuses on the contemporary importance of theatre’s historical foundations. Roughly covers the beginnings through the 18th century.


THEA 301: Theatre Histories II

Offered: Every Spring

Instructor: Matt Saltzberg or Blake Harris

Description: Recognizing theatre as a diverse global art, this course includes and moves beyond the western, white, male cannon, as it provides a space for us as artists, academics, and informed citizens to excavate the past so we can better understand the present in an effort to shape the future. Through creative expressions and theoretical discussions, the course focuses on the contemporary importance of theatre’s historical foundations. Roughly covers the 18th century through the current time.


THEA 490: Feminism and Contemporary Theatre

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Blake Harris

Description: This course is designed to take contemporary plays by women, nonbinary and trans individuals, and BIPOC, Latinx, and other playwrights of marginalized identity and witness the worlds they create through a feminist lens. Each week, a feminist theory will be discussed in connection to the work. Through rigorous discussion, we will collide theory with performance to uncover the potential for radical, contemporary performance experiences.
This class will discuss and critically engage the work of current, groundbreaking female and feminine identified playwrights. Regional theaters are rightfully pursuing gender equity on American stages, meaning we are experiencing some of the boldest and brightest voices the stage has seen in years. From the hyper-realism of Annie Baker to the gritty postmodernism of Young Jean Lee, students will read contemporary pieces, discuss the performance strategies, and ask how the pieces fit into a feminist canon. Some playwrights discussed include Maria Irene Fornes, Adrienne Kennedy, Sarah Kane, Agnes Borinsky, Aleshea Harris, Clare Barron, Alice Birch, Antoinette Nwandu, and Heidi Schreck.

Henson School of Science and Technology

MATH 105: Liberal Arts Mathematics (The Mathematics of Social Justice)

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Alexander Halperin

Description: This project-based course explores social justice issue through a mathematical lens, illustrating issues faced by marginalized populations with numerical models. The topics of focus include student debt, rising sea levels, human trafficking, and gay marriage. The course will also include discussion about neuroplasticity, the ability of the brain to build connections the more it learns.

Seidel School of Education

EDFN 21: School in a Diverse Society

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Alexander Pope

Description: Investigates the founding, purposes, outcomes, and disagreements about American public education. Specific attention to the impact of inequitable policies related to funding, access, testing, and segregation.

EDLD 552: Diversity and Group Dynamics in Educational Leadership

Offered: every Summer

Instructor: Douglas DeWitt

Content consists of the study of diversity and group development within educational settings. An emphasis will be placed on diverse communities, collaboration, decision-making and communication theory, and the development of programs that address student diversity, community relations, and the media. Prerequisites: EDLD 516, 517.

EDUC 504 Diversity in a Democracy

Offered: every Spring and Fall

Instructor: Jon Andes

Description: Examination of contemporary cultural diversity within the United States educational environments. Special attention given to cultural problems and issues that influence opportunities and performance in educational institutions. Human relations skills considered for improving success within culturally diverse populations. Concepts studied include common human needs and explicit and implicit bias and stereotypes in our society. Topics used to explore our personal and societal biases include literacy, gender, religion, race, and disabilities.

ELED 301 Diversity in Education

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Kosta Kyriacopoulos

Description: This course is a close examination of multicultural education and the incorporation of sustaining cultural pedagogies in elementary classrooms. Students will learn how to regard children and culture through a funds of knowledge approach and specifically draw upon their cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic histories to enhance education.

If you believe a class you teach should be on this guide, let us know but submitting to this Diversity and Inclusion Related Courses at SU survey. Currently, we are including courses for Spring 2022-Spring 2023 only.