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Diversity and Inclusion Resources for Curricula: Classes at SU

This list was compiled by SU's Healing Action group, who plan on adding to it as possible.

In fall 2020, Healing Action sent out a call to all SU faculty, asking them to submit any courses they will be teaching within the next academic year that relate to themes of diversity and inclusion, particularly with regard to marginalized populations, histories of representation, and changing cultural politics.
 
This list includes ALL the submissions received from faculty, which are presented without endorsement or editorializing. This is not a comprehensive list, but it is a growing one. The Healing Action group is hopeful that this will provide students with an easy place to look for current courses that resonate with their needs, supplementary to our university catalog--please note that some course listings are not regularly offered, and therefore not automatically covered by other campus publications. Ideally this will also be a useful resource for faculty looking to connect with others with whom they might collaborate.
 
Courses are organized by school and department.

Fulton School of Liberal Arts

ANTH 100: Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Elizabeth Ragan

Description: Gen Ed III B/C. This is an introduction to human culture and communication from anthropology’s holistic and broadly cross-cultural perspective, with an emphasis on understanding cultural difference.  Topics covered include identity (with an emphasis on gender and race), social inequality, and the impacts of colonialism and globalization on non-Western societies.


ANTH 102: Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Elizabeth Ragan

Description: Gen Ed III B/C. This is an introduction to the study of the human past, from our earliest identifiable ancestors on.  (The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.)  Developments in regions other than Europe and the Middle East are highlighted.  Other topics covered include human biological variation (race, DNA as evidence for ancestry) and biomedical anthropology (the impact of disease on human societies).


ANTH 201: Cultural Anthropology Survey: Native North America

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Elizabeth Ragan

Description: Gen Ed III B/C. This provides an overview of traditional Native American and First Nations cultures in the United States and Canada, as well as consideration of how current indigenous communities are adapting to the 21st century.  There were hundreds of distinct cultures in pre-Contact North America, and few outside the indigenous community are aware of that rich diversity.


ANTH 215: Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Elizabeth Ragan

Description: Gen Ed III B/C. This is an introduction to the anthropology of religion, which considers not only text-based world religions such as Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism, but more widespread practices such as shamanism, ancestor worship, and beliefs in witches.  Why do humans believe in the supernatural, and how do such beliefs shape our behavior?

ART 311 History of Pre-Columbian Art

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Jennifer Liston

Description: This course will introduce students to the art and architecture of the indigenous civilizations of Mexico, Central America, and the Andean region of South America from approximately 2000 BCE until European conquest. Lectures and assigned readings will situate principal works of art in their historical, political, and social contexts and functions, with close attention given to the formal, technical, and thematic qualities of these works of art. Themes emphasized will include indigenous conceptions of sacred landscape, specific cultural practices such as shamanism and sacrifice, and art’s role in constructing community identity as well as serving the specific interests of a polity’s ruling elite. Students will also be introduced to the various theoretical and methodological concerns of the field and will learn about the obstacles historians encounter when attempting to reconstruct the indigenous past.


ART 391: Special Topics in Art History

Offered: TBA

Instructor: Jennifer Kruglinski

Description: Global Contemporary Art after 1980, which focuses on the global context of the art world after 1980 (rather than just a western history, as is often the case). A survey of major global art movements after 1980, including key theoretical writings by artists and critics. Topics include the growth of “biennials” and art fairs, the politics of globalism and the market for contemporary art, the artist-as-curator, the post-medium condition, art and identity politics, among others.

CADR 302: Cross-Cultural Conflict and Intervention

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Jacques L. Koko

Description: Culture and its impact on the interactions of individuals and groups is the core concern of this course. The norms, roles, values, beliefs, and traditions of various ethnic and racial groups are primordial to an understanding of why there is conflict among groups. This class emphasizes cultural awareness as a means of more fully understanding the dynamics of controversies among different groups and examines a variety of 'rational' systems, belief and value structures that directly clash with those of neighboring groups.

COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Lori DeWitt, Melany Trenary, Chrys Egan

Course description: Introduction to the basic principles and theories of human communication. Explores contexts such as interpersonal relationships, small groups, organizations, intercultural interaction and public speaking. In each context, practice skills of effective communication while gaining understanding of the relevant theories and research that are foundational to the discipline. Designed for communication arts majors and minors.


COMM 102: Introduction to Mass Media

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Jim Burton, Michael Moeder, Aaron Gurlly, Chrys Egan

Course description: Theory, history, structure and functions of mass media (print, film, recording, radio, television, new media), advertising, journalism and public relations.


COMM 304: Communication, Gender, and Culture

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Chrys Egan

Course description: Explores the relationships among communication, gender and culture. Illuminates the pivotal role of communication in sustaining and altering existing gender and cultural patterns.


COMM 305: Relational Communication

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Darrell Mullins, Chrys Egan

Course description: Examines theories and concepts that highlight the role of communication in personal and intimate relationships. Additional emphasis is on the role of communication in the life-cycle of a relationship.


COMM 312: Nonverbal Communication

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: EJ Han, Chrys Egan

Course description: Study of human communicative behavior without the use of words. Ways of sending and receiving nonverbal messages are examined with the goal of awareness and understanding of their communicative value.


COMM 390: Technology and Relationships

Offered: Summer 2021

Instructor: Chrys Egan

Course description: Examines communication technologies' impact on our relationships with automation, with other people, and with our own minds.


COMM 390/394: Health Communication and Social Justice

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Vinita Agarwal

Description: The pandemic has vividly reinforced and exacerbated disparities affecting  members of highly vulnerable and marginalized populations, who experience a disproportionately high morbidity and mortality burden, while being  most at risk of being without a job, living in poverty, going without food, and being victims of violence. Health Communication and Social Justice offers students a holistic understanding of health communication and its social justice implications. The course guides thinking and action on how health, and communication about it, is connected to all aspects of individuals’ lives (e.g., from the physical to the mental), community life (from the local to the global), and the physical environment. Through application and engagement in lived contexts, the course equips students with conceptual insights and practical knowledge for making a difference in their lives, others’ lives, and community life, especially with regard to promoting health as a social justice issue.


COMM 405: Family Communication

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Carolina Bown, Chrys Egan

Course description: Characterization of family styles of communication as they reflect values, attitudes and perceptions of family members as a group. Examination of effects of individual communication strategies on development of family patterns of interaction.


COMM 430: Political Communication

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: David Burns, Joshua Bolton, Chrys Egan

Course description: Studies the role of media and rhetoric in political campaigns and the political process.

ENGL 253: Short Story

Offered: Summer 2021, Spring 2022

Instructor: Christopher Vilmar

Description: This course studies short stories, particularly their representation of how identites are constructed (such as gender, sexual orientation, race, and so on). There is a focus on historical context, and understanding these stories as an illuminating window on how the past has differed from the present. Of particular interest are the various ways that identity has been conceived and constructed at different points in history.


ENGL 256: Latina/o/x Literature: Geographies of Home

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this course we will read a variety of contemporary Latina/o/x literary texts. The various migration routes and patterns of permanence in these texts represent the wefts and warps of the tapestry of Latina/o/x experience in the US, highlighting the diversity and idiosyncrasy within a group often lumped together under the umbrella term “Latino.” To guide our reading, we will start by interrogating the idea of “home”: What constitutes home? What is the relationship between home and belonging? How do we develop a sense of belonging to a place? How do the ideas of home and belonging underlie the notion of social inclusion and exclusion from social representation? How does the idea of home allow us to articulate narratives of the nation? We will use the seemingly simple notion of home, a commonplace concept that we might take for granted, as the basis for our approach to a Latina/o/x multiverse of literary expression.


ENGL 257: Introduction to Multiethnic US Literatures

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this introduction to multiethnic US literatures we will read literary works written in the 20th and 21st centuries, paying careful attention to their cultural and historical contexts. Addressing questions of cultural identity, national identity, inclusion, alienation, social interaction, adaptation, and assimilation (or resistance to it), we will seek answers to the following questions: What does it mean to live in a diverse society? How do we deal with social and cultural difference? What are the challenges that various ethnic or racial groups face? How do these challenges clash with the idea of the US as a nation that we want to embrace and promote? What is the relationship between diversity, social inclusion, and the American Dream? How does literature help us answer these questions? In our class discussions we will practice close reading as we pay attention to the development of patterns and ideas, fine-tuning our critical skills to develop a common language that will help us interpret and engage with the texts both in conversation and in writing.


ENGL 258: American Women Writers of Color

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: April Logan

Description: In this course, we study American Indian (Native American), African American, Chicana, and Asian American women's writing through the theme of American identity.  In particular, we concern ourselves with how some of the most influential women writers of color of North America have understood American national character and their own American identity from America’s earliest beginnings to the twentieth century. How do these writers' identities and positions as women of diverse races and ethnicities color their perception of America, Americaness, and womanhood?  In addition, what role have these writers played in causing socio-political change?


ENGL 300: Asian American Literature

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this course we will read contemporary Asian American literature, that is, a selection of literary works written by authors of Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Filipino, and Pacific Islander ancestry (all ethnic groups may not be represented in a single semester given the time constraints of our fifteen weeks). As we pay close attention to the cultural and historical contexts for the novels and short stories, we will learn about key historical moments of various Asian countries, their relation to the US, and the history of Asian immigration to the US. Throughout the course, we will seek answers to the following questions: What social and cultural concerns are raised in contemporary Asian American fiction? How do literary works speak to issues of cultural inclusion or exclusion? What are the challenges that Asian Americans face in the US? What is the model minority myth? In our class discussions we will practice close reading as we pay attention to the development of patterns and ideas, fine-tuning our critical skills to develop a common language that will help us interpret and engage with the texts both in conversation and in writing.


ENGL 300: Gay American Fiction [special topics]

Offered: Spring 2022

Instructor: Ross Leasure

Description: The 20th Century in the United States sees the coalescence of a new identity category based upon its divergence from heteronormativity, that of the homosexual or “gay” man. Out of the psychiatric study of so-called sexual pathologies in the late 19th Century, such a figure was created, and as many men recognized in themselves the realization of this new understanding of selfhood, some explored the state, condition, and experiences of men who loved other men in an American milieu characterized by the denial or denigration of those who did not conform. This course examines representative novels by and about gay men from the turn of the century to the decades bracketing the Stonewall Uprising in New York City in 1969. Authors include Edward Prime-Stevenson, Gore Vidal, Edmund White, John Rechy, James Baldwin, and Christopher Isherwood.


ENGL 338: Literature of the Queer

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Ross Leasure

Description: The course explores the emerging awareness of sexual differences through literature. Beginning in the Ancient World, contrasting the attitudes of Hebraic and Hellenic cultures, students gain an understanding of Judeo-Christian perspective on sex as sin, until the advent of psychiatric theory that reimagines that sin as sickness. Through the lens of Foucault’s History of Sexuality, categories of difference reveal sex, gender and sexuality as social constructs forming a self. Representative works from theological and philosophical texts to autobiography, fiction and drama, demonstrate the birth and evolution of a queer consciousness over the centuries that takes on a political identity in the face of longstanding discrimination and persecution. The curriculum attempts to include, to the extent possible, voices from across the LGBTQIA spectrum, as well their intersection with other forms of diversity.


ENGL 383: African American Literature II - Race, Aesthetics, and Politics

Offered: Fall 2022

Instructor: April Logan

Description: Study of major African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. May include such writers as Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Petry, Madhubuti, Sanchez, Morrison, Walker, Wilson, Jones, and Trethewey. In particular, this course traces the evolution of African American aesthetics: provocative debates regarding African American art and literature and the historical developments and figures that shaped them.


ENGL 384: Native American Literature

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Isabel Quintana Wulf

Description: In this course we will read contemporary Native American literature as we work to understand how the notions of “place” and “space” shape Indigenous experiences and identities in the US. Following social and cultural geographer Tim Cresswell’s theorizations of the marked difference between space (abstract concept) and place (concrete experience), we will examine how place “needs to be understood as an embodied relationship with the world. Places are constructed by people doing things and in this sense are never ‘finished’ but are constantly being performed” (Place). As we carefully consider the relationship between space and place, we will start by considering the differences between Euro-American cartographic practices and Indigenous mapmaking. Then we will read works by Native American authors that deal with histories of contact and colonization, removal, allotment, termination, boarding school education, federal Indian policy, sovereignty, repatriation efforts, urban experiences, and survivance. Together, we will ponder how, in anthropologist Keith Basso’s words “when places are actively sensed, the physical landscape becomes wedded to the landscape of the mind” (Wisdom Sits in Places).


ENGL 401: Cinema of Exile

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Ryan Conrath

Description: This course examines historical and contemporary trends in global cinema through the lens of immigration, expatriation, and diaspora. In one way, we will examine these questions by looking at cinematic depictions of immigration and forced displacement in movies like Charlie Chaplin’s The Immigrant, Nagisa Oshima’s Death by Hanging, all the way up to Gianfranco Rosi’s more recent mediation on the migrant crisis in Europe, Fire at Sea. At the same time, we will examine how filmmakers have explored cultural difference and expressed their own diasporic and exilic identities through cinema, as well as how larger forces of imperialism, globalization, and war have shaped the medium’s historical development. Case studies span a variety of practices and geographies: global art cinemas, industrial cinemas, experimental films and works created for the gallery, and even “amateur” filmmakers distributing their work informally on YouTube and elsewhere.


ENGL 401: African-American Cinema

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Elsie Walker

Description: The new Black Lives Matter movement is among the biggest in history, and it represents a massive sea-change in the national consciousness. The movement is about recognizing institutionalized and long-standing histories of racism that we must confront as a nation. This course is all about how films can help us move forward together in this context.

For decades, cinema has been asking us to hear African-American (and all other) voices with more care for racial politics, and from profound humanitarian standpoints. This course surveys many films across time, all of which can resonate for us for our present moment of great urgency. Course selections will range from the celebrated experimental film Killer of Sheep, to the extraordinary documentary I Am Not Your Negro, to the Classical Hollywood cinema of Sydney Poitier, to the contemporary political films of Spike Lee, to films that have become instant landmarks (including, The Hate U Give, and Queen & Slim).

All students are welcome to join this course—no previous training in film studies is required.


ENGL 404: International Cinema

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Elsie Walker

Description: Are you interested in learning more about diverse cultures? Are you interested in studying film? This course will introduce you to a very wide range of films made around the world. The films represent different peoples, circumstances, contexts, nations, and artistic approaches to revealing life. International Cinema is designed to complement other Salisbury University courses on diversity, international studies, politics, and history, as well as all course about media and film analyses. Taking International Cinema will help you develop your writing and research skills in ways that will open up the world for you, for your time at SU and beyond.


ENGL 470/570: Topics in African American Literature | Dark Comedy: Humor in African American Literature

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: April Logan

Description: This course will explore satire, parody, and other modes of humor in African American literature, from the writings of nineteenth-century abolitionist William Wells Brown to the twenty-first century stand-up comedy of Dave Chappelle.


ENGL 476: British Novel I

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Christopher Vilmar

Description: This course looks at the early development of the British novel, particularly studying the rise of women novelists in eighteenth-century England and more broadly questioning the representation of gender and sexuality in the fiction of the period.

ENVR 205: Art, Nature, Culture

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructor: Shane Hall

Description: How do we know the world—the world of humans and of the natural world—through things like books, poems, plays, songs, and stories? How does culture—the ideas and worldviews inherent in our actions— shape the way we relate to the world around us? What lies at the root of our contemporary environmental crisis, and what can we do about it? In this class we use the key tools of the humanities—close reading, critical ethical and argumentative thinking, and creating art—to answer these and other pressing questions. The class is structured around four interrelated inquiries: questions of “values, ethics, and morals,” questions of “nature and the natural,” questions of “power, social inequality, and social justice,” and “stories, representation, and language.” Topics related directly to issues of diversity and inclusion include: environmental racism, religious views of environmental issues, environmental justice, white and male privilege in environmental movements, and climate justice.


ENVR 302: Environment and Society

Offered: every Fall and Spring

Instructors: Mike Lewis & Sarah Surak

Description: Focuses on the interlinked natural and social systems of the contemporary world. Particular attention is given to the qualitative social sciences and history, and to analyzing the public and political discourses surrounding environmental regimes. Topics related to diversity, justice, and inclusion include environmental racism, the global anti-toxics movement, and sustainable development.


ENVR 305: Race, Place, and Nature

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Shane Hall

Description: In this seminar we’ll explore contemporary literature and popular culture to address the following questions: How are issues of racial equity and justice tied to environmental issues? How are people of color “at the frontlines” of environmental crises, but also “at the forefront” of solutions to those crises? How has U.S. environmentalism been shaped by white supremacist movements and furthered their interests? How have other forms of environmentalism and the environmental justice movement worked to dismantle white supremacy? How is the social construction of “race” tied to the construction of  “place” and “nature?” How are the social constructions of race, place, and nature always intersectional; co-created with gender, class, ability, nationality, and religion? These aren’t simple questions, but in an age of accelerating climate change and growing social inequality, they are vital questions for anyone who cares about people and planet.


ENVR 320: Environmental Justice

Offered: every Fall

Instructor: Shane Hall

 Description: Prerequisites Two courses in ENVR or junior standing. The struggle for environmental justice is the struggle against environmental racism and for “human rights, healthy environments, and thriving democracies led by communities most negatively impacted by economic and ecological degradation" (Di Chiro 2016, 100). In this course students study the “Principles of Environmental Justice” outlined by the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit (held in 1991, and 2002). As such, students explore how communities of color and low-income communities struggle to redefine environmentalism in the face of “toxic oppression and oppressive toxics” (Ricardo Levins Morales). By taking the course, students learn how issues of social justice and environmental change are interrelated. To do this, students meet for seminar discussions of primary sources and voices from frontline communities and scholarship from the social sciences and humanities. We examine environmental justice struggles through poetry, plays, politics, protests, and personal testimony. Prerequisites: upper-division status or permission of instructor.

HIST 103 History of World Religion

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Arnold Bienstock

Description: History 103 - history of world religion, is an introduction to the religions of the world.  The class focuses on the historical past of these religions, but also focuses on contemporary issues as well.  We also discuss issues such as the evolving role of women in world religion, human sexuality and religion, and racial/cultural diversity in religion.  For their assignments, students share their own personal racial/cultural/religious roots, attend worship services of various traditions, and study the art/music/architecture of various traditions.   As the class fulfills a General Education requirement, the students are usually freshmen and are majoring in diverse subjects.  Most of the students find the class enlightening - especially trying foods from diverse cultures (unfortunately, more limited now in the age of COVID). 


History 215: Introduction to LGBTQ Studies

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Kara French

Description: An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as literature, history, psychology, sociology, and film by and about LGBTQ people will be studied. The first half of the course will cover LGBTQ history in America. The second half of the course will focus on contemporary issues in LGBTQ life, including but not limited to coming out, marriage equality, identity politics, and queer culture. Meets General Education IIB, history major, and gender and sexuality studies program requirements.  


HIST 215 - Medieval Spain

Offered: Spring 2021 (remote)

Instructor: Belen Vicens

Description: This course traces the history of the Iberian Peninsula from the post-Roman period, through the Middle Ages, and into the early modern period. The history of medieval and early modern Iberia differs significantly from the rest of Europe for two main reasons. One is that for over seven hundred years the peninsula was divided between Christian and Muslim rule in a motley of kingdoms of varying sizes, power, and influence. The other is that by the early modern period the remaining few kingdoms in Iberia were the first empires in modern Europe to connect the old world with the new world.
Across different periods, large numbers of Christians lived under Muslim rule, and large numbers of Muslims under Christian rule. In addition, most major cities had long-established Jewish communities. As a result of multiple migrations and invasions, the peninsula was one of the most culturally and religiously diverse parts of Europe. The interactions between these different groups ranged from fruitful cooperation and tolerance to virulent persecution, and every degree of interaction in between. This course explores the rich, but volatile, relations between these different groups while placing the history of the Iberian Peninsula in the wider European, Mediterranean, and Atlantic context.


History 377: Women in Early America

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Kara French

Description: This course covers the history of women and gender in America from colonization through 1890. The course has two goals: to include women in the standard narrative of the American past, and to ask how that past looks different once women and gender become our focus. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss topics including women’s roles in Colonial America, the American Revolution, reform movements, slavery, and the fight for women’s suffrage. Meets General Education IIB, history major, and gender and sexuality studies program requirements.  


HIST 430: History of Sexuality in the U.S. Capstone Seminar

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Kara French

Description: This seminar examines the methods and historiography of the history of sexuality the U.S. from the colonial era to the recent past. We will explore how sexual norms change over time and will be attentive to how such norms intersect with categories of race, class, religion, and region. We will also investigate a variety of historical methods and approaches to “doing” the history of sexuality—social, legal, cultural, case studies, oral histories, and biographies. Students will have a chance to apply these methods to their own work in the form of a final research project. Open to history majors only.


HIST 430 The British Raj: Colonial Empire in South Asia

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Shruti Patel

Description: This course examines the creation and expansion of British colonialism in India, or the British Raj. The ascent of British rule in the eighteenth century, through its peak in the nineteenth century, illuminates one of the most transformative influences of modern South Asia. How did colonialism originate but also evolve over this period? What ideas, technologies and mechanics structured its backbone? How did this political and social phenomenon affect local actors and lives? In its aftermath, what legacy did European colonialism leave behind?
Rather than a limited view of British rule, this course will allow students to investigate a vibrant range of subjects in course readings, discussion and research, such as: the East India Company; administration by Governors and Residents; concepts of European liberalism, reform and civilization;  Hindu & Muslim legal structures; Indian princes; violence; Christian missionaries; new categories of identity through caste, religion and gender; famines and economics; European knowledge (the disciplines of history and anthropology), non-European history and collective memory, and more.


HIST 490/590 | GSST 485: Gender Studies Capstone Seminar

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Kara French

Description: This course examines gender and sexuality and questions from a multidisciplinary perspective including history. Students will read foundational feminist writings as well as newer scholarship in the field in multiple disciplines. History students will have the opportunity to pursue an independent student-directed research project on a topic relevant to gender studies. A further goal of the course is to help students explore careers and graduate programs relevant to gender and sexuality studies. Meets General Education IIB, history major, and gender and sexuality studies program requirements. Open to non-GSST track students with permission of the instructor.


HIST 490/590: Gandhi: History, Ideas, Legacy

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Shruti Patel

Description: Diverse movements from around the world have drawn on the peaceful protest practices promoted by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) as a key figure in the anti-colonial struggle for Indian freedom from British rule. The course examines Gandhi’s thoughts on non-violence, human behavior and morality, and their manifestation in resistance and civil disobedience movements in India and beyond. Initially, the course charts Gandhi through the sources that shaped his own formative identity and perspective; it then considers the historical circumstances in which non-violence acquired deep significance for Gandhi; finally, it explores the legacy of Gandhian thought in social and political movements globally. Students will examine a combination of Gandhi’s collected works, biographies, a wide range of primary sources, monographs and visual materials. Beyond the conventional view of Gandhi as an advocate of non-violence, the course will pay attention to the inconsistencies of race, caste, class and gender indicated in his thought and action. De-centering normative accounts of Gandhi, students will discuss the difficulty of comprehending the influential figure's complex legacy.

HONR 211: Southern Literature and Anti-Racism: Exploring the Past

Offered: Spring 2021
Instructor: Heather McCarty
Description: In this course, we will explore popular novels and short stories from the Southern Renaissance period (pre-World War II) and their public reception at the time, as well as how they are regarded now.  The course will focus on white authorship, and whether white authors' portrayals of Southern culture were anti-racist, or if their writings, however well-meaning, were in fact stoking the racism and discrimination of their time.  Lastly, we will discuss our contemporary "cancel culture," and wrestle with questions of author intentionality and responsible reading of controversial texts.  Authors will include Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, and others.

FREN 308: Introduction to Francophone Studies Through Film

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Aurélie Van de Wiele

Description: This course aims to introduce the analytical tools necessary for French and Francophone studies through the study of films that depict common experiences that the youth goes through from childhood to adulthood. In particular, discussions focus on current social issues related to diversity (gender, race, nationality, language and class.)


FREN 325 / 480: Francophone Literature and the Question of Identity

Offered: Spring 2021 

Instructor: Arnaud Perret

Description: Students will learn about issues and questions surrounding “Identity” in the French-speaking world since decolonization. The class discussions and writing assignments, based on the readings of texts from diverse literary movements including Négritude and Créolité will address major themes such as race, nationality, gender, and motherhood.


SPAN 316: Culture and Civilization of Latin America

Offered: Spring 2021 

Instructor: Janet Dudley-Eshbach

Description: The course approaches the study of history and culture though gender, race and class issues in Latin America. It also includes topics such as the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration, and Hispanic/Latinx traditions, art, music, and religion. 


SPAN 335 Survey of Literature from Spain

Offered: Spring 2021 

Instructor: Sally Perret

Description: Though one goal of the course is to provide an overview of canonical trends in literature produced in Spain from the beginning of the Spanish language to the present, this course also examines texts related to the "other cultures" of Spain, including texts related to Basque, Catalan and Galician cultures. In addition, we look at how race, sexuality, gender and class have been depicted over the centuries to analyze how our concepts have/have not changed overtime. 


SPAN 336: Survey of Latin American Literature

Offered: Fall 2021 

Instructor: Corinne Pubill

Description: This course emphasizes fundamental issues such as nation building and the role of the intellectual, gender, sexuality, race, and class struggle in order to develop a critical view of literary works within the political, social, and economic realities of Latin America. 

MUSA 102: Jazz Ensemble and Improvisation

Offered: Every semester

Instructor: Jerry Tabor

Description : We'll be talking about racism and impact it has had on the music black musicians created. As we prepare to propose our new Jazz and Culture Minor, which focuses quite a bit on African and Latin culture, the Jazz Ensemble is functioning as an application "lab" of sorts. Study and performance of a variety of jazz styles, including swing, bebop, cool, hard bop, contemporary, blues, fusion and Latin in big band and small and large combo contexts. Study and application of improvisation skills as an integral part of the ensemble experience. Open to all students and community players. Fulfills large ensemble requirement for music major and minor. Performance background, sight-reading skills preferred. Prerequisite: Placement audition required. Contact instructor immediately after registration. three hours per week.


MUSC 210-151: Special Topics in Music: Music of Japanese Pop Culture: From Nintendo to Naruto

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Sachi Murasugi

Description: The music of Japanese Pop Culture such as anime, videogames, and idol groups tells a fascinating story of tradition, commerce, politics and power. We will examine the characteristics of the music, the amalgamation of Japanese and Western musical conventions and influences from other Asian nations, in an effort to understand the broader cultural, technical and societal contexts in which the music was created.


MUSC 222: Popular Music History

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Danielle Cumming

Description: I've redesigned the class to focus entirely on African American music, with all assigned listening and reading to be by African American musicians and authors. This fall, one of the texts I'm using is "Mo' Meta Blues" by Questlove, and I'm following his list of influential recordings as required listening. So my students will listen to the music that Questlove says is important - way better than coming from me!

PHIL 321: PHILOSOPHY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Cristina Cammarano

This course is a philosophical examination of how we think about race, ethnicity, and racism. These topics are frequently discussed but rarely examined in depth and problematized. The course gives you the possibility to learn about how the ideas were formed historically, and to understand how they shape individual experiences and current events in our society.

We will explore questions such as: What is “race”? Is “race” real? What is “ethnicity”? How is personal identity related to race and ethnicity? What is the nature of racism? We will also consider how the idea of race underlies current issues such as mass incarceration, police brutality, and public education. Seminar style. Readings: Du Bois, Fanon, hooks, Martin-Alcoff, Rankine.

PSYC 423: Developmental Disabilities

Offered:  Fall 2021

Instructors:  Heidi Fritz, Jason McCartney

Description: The Developmental Disabilities research area is an interdisciplinary convergence of Developmental Psychology, Health Psychology, Medicine, and Epidemiology.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with various types of developmental disabilities and the impact they have on an individual’s health and functioning, family adaptation, and broader societal issues.  We examine the causes and trajectories of the developmental disabilities most commonly encountered by parents, educators, and medical professionals, including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Seizure Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Neuromuscular Disorders, and AD/HD.  Throughout the course, we orient development within a broader family and community framework, examining the research on family stresses and adaptation, public school laws and practices for accommodating children with disabilities, therapeutic treatments such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy, and issues related to navigating the health care system.  We also examine recent societal changes, difficulties, and controversies that affect people with disabilities, their families, and the professionals serving them.

SOCI 201: Social Problems

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Tim Dunn

Description: Major focus on race/ ethnicity, class, gender and other social inequalities as well as major institutions that reinforce them (economy, political system, HC system, Ed system, Crim. Justice system, Military Industrial complex) and the many social problems this creates, as well as efforts to challenge and change society to reduce these problems.


SOCI 301 Studies in Sociology (Topic: African American Experience)

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Ellen Kang

Description: This course offers a socio-cultural examination of the African American experience, beginning with the history of African slavery, continuing with the Civil Rights Movement and other social movements, and applying Critical Race theory and sociological theoretical perspectives to these events. The course will also include cross-cultural comparisons with the African diaspora in the West Indies/Caribbean. Each time this class is taught it is with a particular theme, such as black social movements, e.g., Black Panthers, college student protests, etc., African American foodways (the cultural practices of food production, preparation, and consumption), or service learning projects with a community organization. The theme for Fall 2021 will be foodways.


SOCI 331: Racial and Cultural Minorities

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Tim Dunn

Description: Not provided


SOCI 339: Immigration

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Tim Dunn

Description: Not provided


SOCI 390: Sociology of Environment 

Offered: every Fall

Instructor: Ryan Sporer

Description: In this class students will review literature relevant to the origins of environmental sociology, assess major competing theories, and learn about cases studies in sociology that incorporate non-social variables. Specific focus is given to the Environmental Racism, Environmental Justice Movement, and Global South Movements. 

THEA 300: Theatre Histories I

Offered: Every Fall

Instructor: Matt Saltzberg or Blake Harris

Description: Recognizing theatre as a diverse global art, this course includes and moves beyond the western, white, male cannon, as it provides a space for us as artists, academics, and informed citizens to excavate the past so we can better understand the present in an effort to shape the future. Through creative expressions and theoretical discussions, the course focuses on the contemporary importance of theatre’s historical foundations. Roughly covers the beginnings through the 18th century.


THEA 301: Theatre Histories II

Offered: Every Spring

Instructor: Matt Saltzberg or Blake Harris

Description: Recognizing theatre as a diverse global art, this course includes and moves beyond the western, white, male cannon, as it provides a space for us as artists, academics, and informed citizens to excavate the past so we can better understand the present in an effort to shape the future. Through creative expressions and theoretical discussions, the course focuses on the contemporary importance of theatre’s historical foundations. Roughly covers the 18th century through the current time.

College of Health and Human Services

NURS 858: Population Health and Clinical Prevention Services

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Anastacia Keenan

Description: Focuses on collaborative strategies in a variety of settings to implement evidence-based clinical prevention and population health services. Students critically analyze and communicate national, regional and local data to discern health disparities across age, sex, gender and ethnicity. Through collaboration with external agencies, students utilize theories of behavioral changes and action research to develop, implement and evaluate healthcare strategies and health promotion plans to address socioeconomic, cultural, ethical, and environmental health issues. Inclusion of global health issues and comprehensive determinants are also discussed.

SOWK 309: Privilege and Oppression

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: to be confirmed

Description: Introduces and sensitizes students to the major concepts of cultural diversity, race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, age, class, sexual orientation, physical and mental abilities, pluralism and conflicts caused by ethnocentrism, discrimination and prejudice. Explores the relationship and intersection between these major concepts and social work practices and policies. Emphasizes the examination of major ethnic groups as well as other social groupings based on such factors as gender, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, physical and mental abilities and other differences in human populations. Evaluates the common elements of oppressions and prejudicial and discriminatory practices from both micro and macro theoretical frames of reference.


SOWK 351: Deaf Culture and Deaf History

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Ellen Schafer-Sallens

Description: Provides insights and perspectives on the cultural aspects and history of the deaf and hard of hearing communities in the United States.


SOWK 454: Multidisciplinary Practice With People Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Ellen Schafer-Sallens

This course will provide insights and perspectives on the psychological, educational, social, rehabilitation, legal and employment aspects of people who are deaf and hard of hearing in the United States.  Topics covered include the following:  audiology of deafness; the psychological impacts of individuals; the psychological issues of hearing children with deaf parents and hearing parents who have deaf children; social impacts for people who are raised in a “deaf world” and/or in a “hearing world”; social services; rehabilitation services; educational issues, legal issues, employment issues, and cultural issues.

Henson School of Science and Technology

MATH 105: Liberal Arts Mathematics (The Mathematics of Social Justice)

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Alexander Halperin

Description: This project-based course explores social justice issue through a mathematical lens, illustrating issues faced by marginalized populations with numerical models. The topics of focus include student debt, rising sea levels, human trafficking, and gay marriage. The course will also include discussion about neuroplasticity, the ability of the brain to build connections the more it learns.

Seidel School of Education

EDFN 21: School in a Diverse Society

Offered: Fall 2021

Instructor: Alexander Pope

Description: Investigates the founding, purposes, outcomes, and disagreements about American public education. Specific attention to the impact of inequitable policies related to funding, access, testing, and segregation.

EDLD 552: Diversity and Group Dynamics in Educational Leadership

Offered: every Summer

Instructor: Douglas DeWitt

Content consists of the study of diversity and group development within educational settings. An emphasis will be placed on diverse communities, collaboration, decision-making and communication theory, and the development of programs that address student diversity, community relations, and the media. Prerequisites: EDLD 516, 517.

EDUC 504 Diversity in a Democracy

Offered: every Spring and Fall

Instructor: Jon Andes

Description: Examination of contemporary cultural diversity within the United States educational environments. Special attention given to cultural problems and issues that influence opportunities and performance in educational institutions. Human relations skills considered for improving success within culturally diverse populations. The course is divided into seven modules addressing the following topics: diversity and human needs; diversity and literacy; diversity and religion; diversity and gender; diversity and race; diversity and poverty; and diversity and disabilities.
 

ELED 398- Diversity and the Family

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Karen M. Carroll

Description: Reviews theories and aspects of cultural competence most relevant to teaching in diverse classrooms. Explores the ideals of equality, equity, advocacy, and human dignity from the perspective of the Family . Provides experiences that will heighten diversity awareness of families and sensitivity towards various groups that make up a Family. Examines different kinds of beliefs, attitudes, values and practices that foster cultural competence at the level.


ELED 499- Diversity and the Community

Offered: Spring 2021

Instructor: Karen M. Carroll

Description: Reviews theories and aspects of cultural competence most relevant to teaching in diverse classrooms. Explores the ideals of freedom, democracy, justice, equality, equity, and human dignity from the perspective of the Community. Provides experiences that will heighten the diversity awareness of communities and sensitivity towards various groups that make up a community. Examines different kinds of beliefs, attitudes, values and practices that foster cultural and linguistic competence at the Community level.

If you believe a class you teach should be on this guide, let us know but submitting to this Diversity and Inclusion Related Courses at SU survey. Currently, we are including courses for Spring 2021-Spring 2022 only.